CSDN论坛 > C++ Builder > Windows SDK/API

section [问题点数:30分,结帖人innocentlogin]

Bbs1
本版专家分:64
结帖率 100%
CSDN今日推荐
Bbs5
本版专家分:2415
Bbs1
本版专家分:64
匿名用户不能发表回复!
其他相关推荐
UNIX环境高级编程(第2版, 含源码)
Copyright Praise for Advanced Programming in the UNIX® Environment, Second Edition Praise for the First Edition Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series Foreword Preface Introduction Changes from the First Edition Acknowledgments Preface to the First Edition Introduction Unix Standards Organization of the Book Examples in the Text Systems Used to Test the Examples Acknowledgments Chapter 1. UNIX System Overview Section 1.1. Introduction Section 1.2. UNIX Architecture Section 1.3. Logging In Section 1.4. Files and Directories Section 1.5. Input and Output Section 1.6. Programs and Processes Section 1.7. Error Handling Section 1.8. User Identification Section 1.9. Signals Section 1.10. Time Values Section 1.11. System Calls and Library Functions Section 1.12. Summary Exercises Chapter 2. UNIX Standardization and Implementations Section 2.1. Introduction Section 2.2. UNIX Standardization Section 2.3. UNIX System Implementations Section 2.4. Relationship of Standards and Implementations Section 2.5. Limits Section 2.6. Options Section 2.7. Feature Test Macros Section 2.8. Primitive System Data Types Section 2.9. Conflicts Between Standards Section 2.10. Summary Exercises Chapter 3. File I/O Section 3.1. Introduction Section 3.2. File Descriptors Section 3.3. open Function Section 3.4. creat Function Section 3.5. close Function Section 3.6. lseek Function Section 3.7. read Function Section 3.8. write Function Section 3.9. I/O Efficiency Section 3.10. File Sharing Section 3.11. Atomic Operations Section 3.12. dup and dup2 Functions Section 3.13. sync, fsync, and fdatasync Functions Section 3.14. fcntl Function Section 3.15. ioctl Function Section 3.16. /dev/fd Section 3.17. Summary Exercises Chapter 4. Files and Directories Section 4.1. Introduction Section 4.2. stat, fstat, and lstat Functions Section 4.3. File Types Section 4.4. Set-User-ID and Set-Group-ID Section 4.5. File Access Permissions Section 4.6. Ownership of New Files and Directories Section 4.7. access Function Section 4.8. umask Function Section 4.9. chmod and fchmod Functions Section 4.10. Sticky Bit Section 4.11. chown, fchown, and lchown Functions Section 4.12. File Size Section 4.13. File Truncation Section 4.14. File Systems Section 4.15. link, unlink, remove, and rename Functions Section 4.16. Symbolic Links Section 4.17. symlink and readlink Functions Section 4.18. File Times Section 4.19. utime Function Section 4.20. mkdir and rmdir Functions Section 4.21. Reading Directories Section 4.22. chdir, fchdir, and getcwd Functions Section 4.23. Device Special Files Section 4.24. Summary of File Access Permission Bits Section 4.25. Summary Exercises Chapter 5. Standard I/O Library Section 5.1. Introduction Section 5.2. Streams and FILE Objects Section 5.3. Standard Input, Standard Output, and Standard Error Section 5.4. Buffering Section 5.5. Opening a Stream Section 5.6. Reading and Writing a Stream Section 5.7. Line-at-a-Time I/O Section 5.8. Standard I/O Efficiency Section 5.9. Binary I/O Section 5.10. Positioning a Stream Section 5.11. Formatted I/O Section 5.12. Implementation Details Section 5.13. Temporary Files Section 5.14. Alternatives to Standard I/O Section 5.15. Summary Exercises Chapter 6. System Data Files and Information Section 6.1. Introduction Section 6.2. Password File Section 6.3. Shadow Passwords Section 6.4. Group File Section 6.5. Supplementary Group IDs Section 6.6. Implementation Differences Section 6.7. Other Data Files Section 6.8. Login Accounting Section 6.9. System Identification Section 6.10. Time and Date Routines Section 6.11. Summary Exercises Chapter 7. Process Environment Section 7.1. Introduction Section 7.2. main Function Section 7.3. Process Termination Section 7.4. Command-Line Arguments Section 7.5. Environment List Section 7.6. Memory Layout of a C Program Section 7.7. Shared Libraries Section 7.8. Memory Allocation Section 7.9. Environment Variables Section 7.10. setjmp and longjmp Functions Section 7.11. getrlimit and setrlimit Functions Section 7.12. Summary Exercises Chapter 8. Process Control Section 8.1. Introduction Section 8.2. Process Identifiers Section 8.3. fork Function Section 8.4. vfork Function Section 8.5. exit Functions Section 8.6. wait and waitpid Functions Section 8.7. waitid Function Section 8.8. wait3 and wait4 Functions Section 8.9. Race Conditions Section 8.10. exec Functions Section 8.11. Changing User IDs and Group IDs Section 8.12. Interpreter Files Section 8.13. system Function Section 8.14. Process Accounting Section 8.15. User Identification Section 8.16. Process Times Section 8.17. Summary Exercises Chapter 9. Process Relationships Section 9.1. Introduction Section 9.2. Terminal Logins Section 9.3. Network Logins Section 9.4. Process Groups Section 9.5. Sessions Section 9.6. Controlling Terminal Section 9.7. tcgetpgrp, tcsetpgrp, and tcgetsid Functions Section 9.8. Job Control Section 9.9. Shell Execution of Programs Section 9.10. Orphaned Process Groups Section 9.11. FreeBSD Implementation Section 9.12. Summary Exercises Chapter 10. Signals Section 10.1. Introduction Section 10.2. Signal Concepts Section 10.3. signal Function Section 10.4. Unreliable Signals Section 10.5. Interrupted System Calls Section 10.6. Reentrant Functions Section 10.7. SIGCLD Semantics Section 10.8. Reliable-Signal Terminology and Semantics Section 10.9. kill and raise Functions Section 10.10. alarm and pause Functions Section 10.11. Signal Sets Section 10.12. sigprocmask Function Section 10.13. sigpending Function Section 10.14. sigaction Function Section 10.15. sigsetjmp and siglongjmp Functions Section 10.16. sigsuspend Function Section 10.17. abort Function Section 10.18. system Function Section 10.19. sleep Function Section 10.20. Job-Control Signals Section 10.21. Additional Features Section 10.22. Summary Exercises Chapter 11. Threads Section 11.1. Introduction Section 11.2. Thread Concepts Section 11.3. Thread Identification Section 11.4. Thread Creation Section 11.5. Thread Termination Section 11.6. Thread Synchronization Section 11.7. Summary Exercises Chapter 12. Thread Control Section 12.1. Introduction Section 12.2. Thread Limits Section 12.3. Thread Attributes Section 12.4. Synchronization Attributes Section 12.5. Reentrancy Section 12.6. Thread-Specific Data Section 12.7. Cancel Options Section 12.8. Threads and Signals Section 12.9. Threads and fork Section 12.10. Threads and I/O Section 12.11. Summary Exercises Chapter 13. Daemon Processes Section 13.1. Introduction Section 13.2. Daemon Characteristics Section 13.3. Coding Rules Section 13.4. Error Logging Section 13.5. Single-Instance Daemons Section 13.6. Daemon Conventions Section 13.7. ClientServer Model Section 13.8. Summary Exercises Chapter 14. Advanced I/O Section 14.1. Introduction Section 14.2. Nonblocking I/O Section 14.3. Record Locking Section 14.4. STREAMS Section 14.5. I/O Multiplexing Section 14.6. Asynchronous I/O Section 14.7. readv and writev Functions Section 14.8. readn and writen Functions Section 14.9. Memory-Mapped I/O Section 14.10. Summary Exercises Chapter 15. Interprocess Communication Section 15.1. Introduction Section 15.2. Pipes Section 15.3. popen and pclose Functions Section 15.4. Coprocesses Section 15.5. FIFOs Section 15.6. XSI IPC Section 15.7. Message Queues Section 15.8. Semaphores Section 15.9. Shared Memory Section 15.10. ClientServer Properties Section 15.11. Summary Exercises Chapter 16. Network IPC: Sockets Section 16.1. Introduction Section 16.2. Socket Descriptors Section 16.3. Addressing Section 16.4. Connection Establishment Section 16.5. Data Transfer Section 16.6. Socket Options Section 16.7. Out-of-Band Data Section 16.8. Nonblocking and Asynchronous I/O Section 16.9. Summary Exercises Chapter 17. Advanced IPC Section 17.1. Introduction Section 17.2. STREAMS-Based Pipes Section 17.3. UNIX Domain Sockets Section 17.4. Passing File Descriptors Section 17.5. An Open Server, Version 1 Section 17.6. An Open Server, Version 2 Section 17.7. Summary Exercises Chapter 18. Terminal I/O Section 18.1. Introduction Section 18.2. Overview Section 18.3. Special Input Characters Section 18.4. Getting and Setting Terminal Attributes Section 18.5. Terminal Option Flags Section 18.6. stty Command Section 18.7. Baud Rate Functions Section 18.8. Line Control Functions Section 18.9. Terminal Identification Section 18.10. Canonical Mode Section 18.11. Noncanonical Mode Section 18.12. Terminal Window Size Section 18.13. termcap, terminfo, and curses Section 18.14. Summary Exercises Chapter 19. Pseudo Terminals Section 19.1. Introduction Section 19.2. Overview Section 19.3. Opening Pseudo-Terminal Devices Section 19.4. pty_fork Function Section 19.5. pty Program Section 19.6. Using the pty Program Section 19.7. Advanced Features Section 19.8. Summary Exercises Chapter 20. A Database Library Section 20.1. Introduction Section 20.2. History Section 20.3. The Library Section 20.4. Implementation Overview Section 20.5. Centralized or Decentralized? Section 20.6. Concurrency Section 20.7. Building the Library Section 20.8. Source Code Section 20.9. Performance Section 20.10. Summary Exercises Chapter 21. Communicating with a Network Printer Section 21.1. Introduction Section 21.2. The Internet Printing Protocol Section 21.3. The Hypertext Transfer Protocol Section 21.4. Printer Spooling Section 21.5. Source Code Section 21.6. Summary Exercises Appendix A. Function Prototypes Appendix B. Miscellaneous Source Code Section B.1. Our Header File B.2 Standard Error Routines Appendix C. Solutions to Selected Exercises Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter 13 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Chapter 16 Chapter 17 Chapter 18 Chapter 19 Chapter 20 Chapter 21 Bibliography Index
QString::section
QString::section 用来以某个字符切割字符串。 函数原型为:QString QString::section ( QChar sep, int start, int end = -1, SectionFlags flags = SectionDefault ) const 函数返回值为切割后的字符串 以下为Qt 助手给我们提供的例子,sep表示用来切割的
ConfigParser.NoSectionError: No section: 'formatters'原因及解决办法
#logtester.py import logging import logging.config logging.config.fileConfig("D:/test/python/proj1/PythonApplication1/PythonTest/conf/logging.conf") # 这里如果路径写错了就会出现该错误,另外python文件路径中"\"和"/"
".section .text.lock,\"ax\"\n" \
兄弟最近正在看读写锁的实现,如下这段汇编的这一句{".section .text.lock,\"ax\"\n" \}不太明白,特别是这句中的"ax"是做什么的?恳请各位赐教,谢谢! #define __build_write_lock_const(rw, helper) \      asm volatile(LOCK "subl $" RW_LOCK_BIAS_STR ",(
汇编-自定义section
1.1、语法格式      .section section_name[,"flags"[,%type[,flag_specific_arguments]]] 1.2、作用   定义一个段,每一个段以段名为开始,以下一个段名或者文件结尾为结束。   ELF格式允许的段标志: a:可分配              w:可写段
Laravel模板引擎Blade中section的一些标签的区别介绍
这篇文章主要介绍了Laravel模板引擎Blade中section的一些标签的区别介绍,本文讲解了@yield 与 @section、@show 与 @stop、@append 和 @override的区别,需要的朋友可以参考下 Laravel 框架中的 Blade 模板引擎,很好用,但是在官方文档中有关 Blade 的介绍并不详细,有些东西没有写出来,而有些则是
attribute 用法 section 部分
attribute 用法 section 部分 http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_5e11a56a0100c8h5.html### 1. gcc的__attribute__编译属性 要了解Linux Kernel代码的分段信息,需要了解一下gcc的__attribute__的编绎属性,__attribute__主要用于改变所声明或定义的函数或
html中<section>标签的理解
关于html<setion>标签的初步了解
GNU汇编程序中的分段(.section伪操作)
GNU汇编程序中的分段 <1>    .section伪操作 .section {,””} Starts a new code or data section. Sections in GNU are called .text, a code section, .data, an initialized data section, and .bss, an uninitialized dat
OpenGL Shading Language, Second Edition
PDF 格式,绝对可以打开,=) Chapter 1. Review of OpenGL Basics Section 1.1. OpenGL History Section 1.2. OpenGL Evolution Section 1.3. Execution Model Section 1.4. The Frame Buffer Section 1.5. State Section 1.6. Processing Pipeline Section 1.7. Drawing Geometry Section 1.8. Drawing Images Section 1.9. Coordinate Transforms Section 1.10. Texturing Section 1.11. Summary Section 1.12. Further Information Chapter 2. Basics Section 2.1. Introduction to the OpenGL Shading Language Section 2.2. Why Write Shaders? Section 2.3. OpenGL Programmable Processors Section 2.4. Language Overview Section 2.5. System Overview Section 2.6. Key Benefits Section 2.7. Summary Section 2.8. Further Information Chapter 3. Language Definition Section 3.1. Example Shader Pair Section 3.2. Data Types Section 3.3. Initializers and Constructors Section 3.4. Type Conversions Section 3.5. Qualifiers and Interface to a Shader Section 3.6. Flow Control Section 3.7. Operations Section 3.8. Preprocessor Section 3.9. Preprocessor Expressions Section 3.10. Error Handling Section 3.11. Summary Section 3.12. Further Information Chapter 4. The OpenGL Programmable Pipeline Section 4.1. The Vertex Processor Section 4.2. The Fragment Processor Section 4.3. Built-in Uniform Variables Section 4.4. Built-in Constants Section 4.5. Interaction with OpenGL Fixed Functionality Section 4.6. Summary Section 4.7. Further Information Chapter 5. Built-in Functions Section 5.1. Angle and Trigonometry Functions Section 5.2. Exponential Functions Section 5.3. Common Functions Section 5.4. Geometric Functions Section 5.5. Matrix Functions Section 5.6. Vector Relational Functions Section 5.7. Texture Access Functions Section 5.8. Fragment Processing Functions Section 5.9. Noise Functions Section 5.10. Summary Section 5.11. Further Information Chapter 6. Simple Shading Example Section 6.1. Brick Shader Overview Section 6.2. Vertex Shader Section 6.3. Fragment Shader Section 6.4. Observations Section 6.5. Summary Section 6.6. Further Information Chapter 7. OpenGL Shading Language API Section 7.1. Obtaining Version Information Section 7.2. Creating Shader Objects Section 7.3. Compiling Shader Objects Section 7.4. Linking and Using Shaders Section 7.5. Cleaning Up Section 7.6. Query Functions Section 7.7. Specifying Vertex Attributes Section 7.8. Specifying Uniform Variables Section 7.9. Samplers Section 7.10. Multiple Render Targets Section 7.11. Development Aids Section 7.12. Implementation-Dependent API Values Section 7.13. Application Code for Brick Shaders Section 7.14. Summary Section 7.15. Further Information Chapter 8. Shader Development Section 8.1. General Principles Section 8.2. Performance Considerations Section 8.3. Shader Debugging Section 8.4. Shader Development Tools Section 8.5. Scene Graphs Section 8.6. Summary Section 8.7. Further Information Chapter 9. Emulating OpenGL Fixed Functionality Section 9.1. Transformation Section 9.2. Light Sources Section 9.3. Material Properties and Lighting Section 9.4. Two-Sided Lighting Section 9.5. No Lighting Section 9.6. Fog Section 9.7. Texture Coordinate Generation Section 9.8. User Clipping Section 9.9. Texture Application Section 9.10. Summary Section 9.11. Further Information Chapter 10. Stored Texture Shaders Section 10.1. Access to Texture Maps from a Shader Section 10.2. Simple Texturing Example Section 10.3. Multitexturing Example Section 10.4. Cube Mapping Example Section 10.5. Another Environment Mapping Example Section 10.6. Glyph Bombing Section 10.7. Summary Section 10.8. Further Information Chapter 11. Procedural Texture Shaders Section 11.1. Regular Patterns Section 11.2. Toy Ball Section 11.3. Lattice Section 11.4. Bump Mapping Section 11.5. Summary Section 11.6. Further Information Chapter 12. Lighting Section 12.1. Hemisphere Lighting Section 12.2. Image-Based Lighting Section 12.3. Lighting with Spherical Harmonics Section 12.4. The ÜberLight Shader Section 12.5. Summary Section 12.6. Further Information Chapter 13. Shadows Section 13.1. Ambient Occlusion Section 13.2. Shadow Maps Section 13.3. Deferred Shading for Volume Shadows Section 13.4. Summary Section 13.5. Further Information Chapter 14. Surface Characteristics Section 14.1. Refraction Section 14.2. Diffraction Section 14.3. BRDF Models Section 14.4. Polynomial Texture Mapping with BRDF Data Section 14.5. Summary Section 14.6. Further Information Chapter 15. Noise Section 15.1. Noise Defined Section 15.2. Noise Textures Section 15.3. Trade-offs Section 15.4. A Simple Noise Shader Section 15.5. Turbulence Section 15.6. Granite Section 15.7. Wood Section 15.8. Summary Section 15.9. Further Information Chapter 16. Animation Section 16.1. On/Off Section 16.2. Threshold Section 16.3. Translation Section 16.4. Morphing Section 16.5. Other Blending Effects Section 16.6. Vertex Noise Section 16.7. Particle Systems Section 16.8. Wobble Section 16.9. Summary Section 16.10. Further Information Chapter 17. Antialiasing Procedural Textures Section 17.1. Sources of Aliasing Section 17.2. Avoiding Aliasing Section 17.3. Increasing Resolution Section 17.4. Antialiased Stripe Example Section 17.5. Frequency Clamping Section 17.6. Summary Section 17.7. Further Information Chapter 18. Non-Photorealistic Shaders Section 18.1. Hatching Example Section 18.2. Technical Illustration Example Section 18.3. Mandelbrot Example Section 18.4. Summary Section 18.5. Further Information Chapter 19. Shaders for Imaging Section 19.1. Geometric Image Transforms Section 19.2. Mathematical Mappings Section 19.3. Lookup Table Operations Section 19.4. Color Space Conversions Section 19.5. Image Interpolation and Extrapolation Section 19.6. Blend Modes Section 19.7. Convolution Section 19.8. Summary Section 19.9. Further Information Chapter 20. RealWorldz Section 20.1. Features Section 20.2. RealWorldz Internals Section 20.3. Implementation Section 20.4. Atmospheric Effects Section 20.5. Ocean Section 20.6. Clouds Section 20.7. Summary Section 20.8. Further Information Chapter 21. Language Comparison Section 21.1. Chronology of Shading Languages Section 21.2. RenderMan Section 21.3. OpenGL Shader (ISL) Section 21.4. HLSL Section 21.5. Cg Section 21.6. Summary Section 21.7. Further Information Appendix A. Language Grammar Appendix B. API Function Reference
关闭